Archives for posts with tag: France

A demonstration called by steel industry trade unions in the Liège area in October 2011 drew thousands. On the town square in Seraing, the crowd roared “All together! All together!” The sound echoed back from the nearby Standard de Liège stadium and from the ArcelorMittal blast furnace, standing idle a little further off. Ten days earlier the steelmaker had said it was closing its hot phase (1) facilities in Liège and nearly 600 jobs were on the line; and eventually the cold phase facilities might also close. Steelmaking, which had driven the regional economy for nearly 200 years, seemed doomed.

however as the article begun:

Liège, the ‘cité ardente’, has undergone considerable change. The disappearance of the mines and decline of the steel industry hit the city hard. But the saying ‘Do as they do in Liège, let it rain’ may no longer apply. For the economic capital of Wallonia, with a population of 200,000, or 600,000 including suburbs, is being reborn. The steel workers are battling to save its last blast furnaces; an underground system, trams and high-speed train station will transform its centre; and its film industry, starting with the Dardenne brothers, is booming. Now the city dreams of hosting host Expo 2017

Just don’t miss it!

The president of the French republic raised a mountain, and it has fallen on his toes. In launching its offensive against the Roma, the French government believed it could turn to its electoral advantage a problem which is essentially a problem of border policing and the state authorities. Major error. The question of the Roma is not about public or social security, it is about mental security. And it is not a uniquely French problem, it is a European problem.

After the fall of the Iron Curtain, the American daily the Los Angeles Times conducted one of the first polls in Eastern Europe in 1990. The results showed that for 80 percent of the populations freshly freed from Communism – Czechs, Hungarians, Romanians, Bulgarians and Poles, the ‘Gypsy’ was the incarnation of the diabolical other.

In the nineties and in the face of strong popular resistance, Czech President Vaclav Havel tore down a ghetto where his people wanted to see the “travelling people” incarcerated. The hatred of the “Gypsies” may be widespread and have seen its worse excesses in Eastern Europe, but it is certainly no stranger to the West. Nineteen century literature and opera – from Victor Hugo to Verdi – amply betrays the fears of the sedentary about the non-territorial collective. Begging, disease, thieving, and even fantasies about child snatching – such were the associations that for centuries haunted a European mind living in fear of “people who don’t live as we do”. Propelling this hysteria to its extreme, the Nazis sent these “sub-humans” to the gas chambers.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius on Friday called for the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to be “smashed fast” as he visited Turkey’s largest refugee camp near the Syrian
border.

 

He should be worried if France is smashed (by the Big Crisis) first…